These are some of my favorite 2019 titles for those in grades 6-12 (and Adults!). Some work for younger, some for older, so watch the video and/or read the list below for my guidelines.


Side note: you'll get to hear the monthly tsunami warning siren drill since I was recording this outside on the first business day of the month and forgot what time it was. Oh, well. I talked over it.



Books Mentioned in the video: Scythe/The Thunderhead/The Toll by Neal Shusterman Look Both Ways by Jason Reynolds (grades 5-9, or whoever is reading Ghost by the author)

New Kid by Jerry Craft (grades 4-8)

Stargazing by Jen Wang (grades 4-8) (Plus, The Prince & the Dressmaker, grades 7-12)

Guts by Reina Telgemeier (wherever her books are popular!) Roll With It by Jaime Sumner (grades 5-8)

Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky by Kwame Mbalia (grades 5-9)

It's Trevor Noah: Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (and Born a Crime. ALL AGES, 6th grade through adult) Torpedoed by Deborah Heiligman (6th grade through adult) 1919 by Martin W. Sandler (6th grade through adult) There's Something About Sweetie by Sandhya Menon (grades 7-12)

Frankly in Love by David Yoon (grades 8-12) Slay by Brittany Morris (grades 8-12) Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay (grades 9-12, and adult)

Check out the FULL LIST of gift book suggestions for all ages, PreK-Adult. Uncle Joe? Grandma Joan? Your nephew? Books make great gifts for everyone, especially your own kids, and there is a book for every reader on the list. And for every occasion. Also, if you have kids of your own and you plan on getting their teacher(s) a gift this holiday season, consider a monetary (gift card) donation to help them add to their classroom library. We love new books, and so do the students we teach!


Missed the previous posts and need more book suggestions? Holiday Reads Hawaii Life

Elementary (PreK-4th) Happy Reading and Happy Holidays!


#FridayFive #newbooks #highschool #middleschool #yalit #nonfiction #memoir #graphicnovel #awardwinner #giftbooks #booksmakegreatgifts #mrsyuskoreads #booksuggestions


Today I am highlighting some of my favorite 2019 titles that would make good gifts for the elementary (PreK - 4th grade+) kiddos on your list. Watch the video and/or see the list below for titles and grade level suggestions.


Side note: find out why my phone auto-corrects most words starting with "R" to "Ryan T. Higgins."



Books Mentioned in the video: Undefeated by Kwame Alexander and Kadir Nelson (grades 3 - 12, plus your writing and history teacher friends' classroom library). Bruce and the Big Storm by Ryan T. Higgins (PreK - 3rd) Bruce's Big Fun Day by Ryan T. Higgins (K-2nd, or new readers) Hair Love by Matthew Cherry and Vashti Harrison (PreK - 3rd, and up for #classroombookaday) The Proudest Blue by Ibtihaj Muhammad, S.K. Ali, and Hatem Aly (K-5th, and older for #classroombookaday) You Are Home by Evan Turk (All Ages! Even adult fans of National Parks) Earth/Sun/Moon series by Stacy McAnulty (Elementary) Questioneers series by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts (1st- 4th) Dear Justice League by Michael Northrup and Gustavo Duarte (3rd - 6th) Scary Stories for Young Foxes by Christian McKay Heidicker (3rd - 5th) Lety Out Loud by Angela Cervantes (4th - 6th) Because of the Rabbit by Cynthia Lord (3rd - 5th)


Find the FULL LIST of gift book suggestions for all ages, PreK-Adult. Uncle Joe? Grandma Joan? Your nephew? Books make great gifts for everyone, especially your own kids, and there is a book for every reader on the list... and every occasion. Also, if you have kids of your own and you plan on getting their teacher(s) a gift this holiday season, consider a monetary (gift card) donation to help them add to their classroom library. We love new books, and so do the students we teach!


In the meantime, this week's Friday Five will help you check off some of your holiday shopping list. Happy Reading and Happy Holidays!


Previous #bookmas posts:

Holiday Reads Hawaii Life


#FridayFive #newbooks #middleschool #nonfiction #picturebook #kidlit #elementary #giftbooks #booksmakegreatgifts #mrsyuskoreads #booksuggestions

Updated: Dec 10, 2019


The holiday gift-giving season is upon us, and the countdown to winter break is...

So.

Very.

Close.


For this week's Friday Five, I am highlighting some of my favorite 2019 holiday-themed picture books. They would make great #classroombookaday read alouds with your students of all ages, picture books to share with your family, or gift giving.


Side note: Find out why you should follow Dan Santat on social media this holiday season.

Books Mentioned in the video: The Great Santa Stakeout by Betsy Bird and Dan Santat Dasher by Matt Tavares (Also, Red & Lulu) The Crayons' Christmas by Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers The Shortest Day by Susan Cooper and Carson Ellis Between Us and Abuela by Mitali Perkins and Sara Palacios Finding Narnia by Caroline McAlister and Jessica Lanan Fry Bread by Kevin Noble-Maillard and Juana Martinez-Neal Freedom Soup by Tami Charles and Jacqueline Alcantara

Stay tuned next week when I'll post the FULL LIST of gift book suggestions for all ages, PreK-Adult. Uncle Joe? Grandma Joan? Your nephew? Books make great gifts for everyone, especially your own kids, and there is a book for every reader on the list. Also, if you have kids of your own and you plan on getting their teacher(s) a gift this holiday season, consider a monetary (gift card) donation to help them add to their classroom library. We love new books, and so do the students we teach!


In the meantime, this week's Friday Five will help you kick off your holiday reading. Happy Reading and Happy Holidays!


#FridayFive #newbooks #highschool #middleschool #yalit #nonfiction #memoir #picturebook #kidlit #elementary #giftbooks #booksmakegreatgifts #mrsyuskoreads #booksuggestions



I hope that your summer was restful, relaxing, rejuvenating... everything that you needed it to be. And that you read a good book or two, or 12! Mine wasn't necessarily restful since I feel like my life is crazier now than ever, but I did manage to go social media silent for most of August which felt great.

Whether you have been back in school for over a month like my own daughter (fingers crossed for a great SENIOR YEAR), or for two weeks like the school I'm working at, or you start after Labor Day, I wish you a great 2019-2020 school year, filled with BOOKS for you and your students!

I have resources to help you now and throughout the year. Here are some tools to gear up for a great year of READING:

1) I have posted my Back to School Booktalk Videos for 2nd-12th grades here and on TPT. These 25 - 35 minute videos are great to get your students excited about reading this school year! If you are not a paid subscriber to MrsYuskoReads, then you can find them on my TPT site. The bundle of all the videos PLUS a FREE 30 minute PD video of best new Picture Books for all grades is ON SALE NOW!

Already a MrsYuskoReads.com subscriber? You have FREE access to all of them now...click here, choose "subscriber webinars" and login.

Want to become a subscriber? Click here for the details!

2) Missed my Summer Reading suggestions for all grades? Never fear! Reading doesn't just happen in the summer and these lists contain great new books for your students. Feel free to copy and distribute as needed! I have posted my Booklists for all grade levels (PreK-12th...and adult!) on my website, including Top 10 picks for Elementary, Middle School, and High School. Or email me and I can send them to you.

3) Everyone has access to my Best New Picture Books for all Grades (K-12) video! This 30 minute video highlights some of the best new picture books of 2019 that you will want to read aloud, have in your classroom library, use to introduce curriculum, or read for #classroombookaday. This video is designed as PD, to show your staff to help them keep current on the best new picture books to be used in the classroom. Picture books are not just for the youngest students. Most of the books mentioned can be read aloud to all grades, while a few are actually better suited for use in middle/high school classes.

Watch a 10 minute sample of this video below, which highlights the best Back to School Picture Books. The FREE full-length video (about 30 minutes) can be found on my website, or on TPT.



Happy reading!

#backtoschool #bestbooks #newbooks #mrsyuskoreads #booktalks #teachers #librarians #elementary #middleschool #highschool #yalit #kidlit #picturebooks

Besides talking about books at my #yalit seminars, I also share real-world examples of student success stories, classroom activities, and how I incorporate and promote reading during the school day.


I can talk about the importance of CHOICE reading ad nauseum, and could probably write a dissertation on the topic at this point. So instead, I thought I would focus this post on student responses to reading. One of the questions I get asked frequently is "how do you know if they've read the book?" I'm going to be honest, READING is the point of the class for me and what I consider the most important. But you're right, schools require us to grade something, and since I hate reading logs, here are some ideas that I do throughout the year.


1) Free Read Friday: Barring assemblies, field days, or standardized testing, our Fridays are spent READING! As long as students are on task, we spend the 45-ish minutes of class "silent" reading. (All of us...teacher included). First of all, I will fight any administrator that says this is a waste of time. Luckily I don't have to at my school. Now, before you think that I've cracked the code to keep a class full of teenagers silent, on task, and reading for 45 minutes, I haven't. Fridays are days where I have reading conversations with students, do formal and informal booktalks as needed, give students the opportunity to write book reviews and tell other students about what they're reading, and more. Of course, the majority of the time is spent reading, and I'll be honest, most of my students honor this time and their classmates by finding a place to relax and read. I think most of them appreciated the "break" from the stresses of other classes. Do students get off task? Sure. Are there students who don't read? Sometimes. But as with any classroom, you deal with that as necessary.


2) Reading Response Projects: Besides informal conversations, book reviews, and the occasional in-class on-demand writing prompt, students are required to complete a "project" after their reading. (Middle school and high school had different guidelines for number of books read vs projects completed but every one had to complete at least a few each semester). At the start of the year I offered students a list of choices for these projects as well as guidelines/rubrics. They included anything from one-pagers, book commercials, and poetry journals... to comic strips, quote posters, and Snapchat stories. Here are a few samples of my high school class' projects this spring:


Digital art representing Moxie by Jen Mathieu

One pager for Samurai Rising by Pamela S. Turner

One pager for The Girl Who Was Supposed To Die by April Henry

Comic strip for a poem in The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Quote poster for Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

Playlist for The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Part of the script of a book commercial for The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang.

Comic Strip for Treasure Island

Persuasive presentation on why I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson is the "best book ever."

3) Student Created Projects: Besides giving them a list of acceptable project ideas, I invite students to come up with their own (teacher-approved) ideas for projects that demonstrate reading. This is how, for the last project of the year, I was convinced by my seniors to let them bring in food that represented their book (because yes, they wanted a class party and we weren't technically allowed to have one). Let me tell you, the level of thought that went into these food choices was TERRIFIC and definitely showed their comprehension of the books.


4) Volunteering at Literacy Events: True, it's voluntary and not graded, but I encourage my students to volunteer at our monthly Feed n Read events. This is a great opportunity for younger students in our community to interact with teens and tweens and to have positive, shared reading experiences. It has the added benefit of being an enjoyable experience for my students as well. I always offer the option to trade out one "assignment" per semester in exchange for volunteering at one event. Let's be real, life gets busy, and there are a myriad of reasons why students may not be able to complete an assignment. But our Feed n Reads always need volunteers and the younger kids LOVE reading with the teens so it's actually a win for more than just me. And most of my students that volunteer come each month, not just the one time...proof that they secretly enjoy reading with the kids.


5) Book Character TED Talk: We did TED Talk Tuesday in our classroom each week. You can read more about that here. As a final project, I had my Contemporary Lit students choose a book character (from a book they read this year) that they would want to give a TED Talk, and then outline the key points or message that would be included. Again, WOW! I received some amazing responses. Definitely an assignment I'm keeping in the rotation.


What are some of your favorite reading-related classroom activities?



#classroom #contemporarylit #studentchoice #choicereading #TEDTalk #FeednRead #studentwork #highschool #middleschool #reading #freereadfriday


It's the madness that is May: you survived testing season only to be rewarded with too many things to do before summer vacation and not enough days left in the school year. I feel your pain! (For those of you that get out of school in June, please just procrastinate reading this post until then).


Are you looking to get your kids excited about READING this summer? Don't have time to read all the books yourself? Looking for a way to promote good books to your students in a limited amount of time? I've got you COVERED!


Every year I create Summer Reading Booktalk videos for some of my teacher friends. This year I thought, why not make these available to anyone that's interested? So, over the weekend I recorded four videos, highlighting good books for various grade levels that your students will want to read this summer! If you already have a subscription to MrsYuskoReads, you can access all of them for FREE immediately. Click here, choose "subscriber webinars," and login with your email. They can be found under "Subscriber Booktalks." ENJOY!


Videos range in length from 16:00-35:00 minutes (depending on grade level) and can be shown in class or uploaded to your Google classroom. They are designed for students "graduating" from the grade levels listed below, but depending on your readers they might find books of interest in the one above or below. You know your audience best. You can choose from:

2nd-4th Grades

5th- 7th Grades

8th - 9th Grades

High School


Not a subscriber? You can join now and get immediate access to all of these videos, plus past webinars on best new books.

OR... I've made the 2nd-4th Grade one available for free to everyone...click here (you'll find it under "Booktalks") or scroll down.


OR...You can purchase individual videos on my TPT site. I've also bundled all four together, but feel free to contact me for a special bundle price if you only want two of them. Stay tuned for "Are You Summer Reading Ready, Part 2" later this week where I'll post my FREE Summer Reading Suggestions Book Lists for all ages, PreK- ADULTS! Can't wait? Click here and see last year's lists. Print, post, share WIDELY!


Happy reading! See you soon with more to help you get Summer Reading READY.

#summerreading #bestbooks #newbooks #mrsyuskoreads #booktalks #teachers #librarians #elementary #middleschool #highschool #yalit #kidlit

Updated: May 17, 2019


In honor of Teacher Appreciation AND the fact that I just finished my LAST #yalit seminar of the 2018-2019 school year, I've lowered the price of several resources and created a sale bundle on my TPT site.


You can get my "What's New in YA Lit" seminar handbook (all 200+ pages of it) as a PDF (sorry, I'm not killing any more trees) for $29 right now! I've also bundled this handbook, the seminar presentation slides, and a Kid Lit bibliography for $32.30. Check out my TPT store here!

I've lowered the prices on all of my handbooks, highlighting the best books of 2018, 2017, and 2016. Buy the current one, buy all 3... this is a great time to get them.


Happy reading!


PS: The 2019 "Best New Books" handbook will go live at the end of 2019. Stay tuned.




#seminar #bestnewbooks #handbook #teacherspayteachers #mrsyuskoreads #middleschool #highschool #yalit #teachers #librarians



I was scrolling through my camera roll last week and I came across this picture from the first part of April. My middle school classes (and this group in particular) were deep in thought over an April Fools' Day digital breakout from Mr. & Mrs. Rooster.

This was the second digital breakout that we had done this semester, and the 5th "team challenge" activity.


I loved the digital breakout for it's ease of use (both teacher and student), and that it was ready to go. I just had to link to our Google classroom page and print out the answer sheet for teams to fill out.

As a whole, my two middle school classes have STRUGGLED with activities that require them to problem solve, follow directions, and find the answers on their own. They want me to show/tell them exactly what the answer is without putting in any effort. They LOVE doing digital breakouts and team challenges (often STEM focused) but wow, do several of the groups complain while they are doing them. Here are just a few of the comments I hear throughout the class period:

"We can't find the answer." "What's the answer?"

"I don't understand."


Now, please note, that this breakout was NOT too challenging and several groups finished it around the 25 minute mark (I had budgeted 40 minutes for the activity). It is designed for 4th-8th grades and my groups are 6th and 7th graders. If you actually take the time to READ the clues, every puzzle can be solved without difficulty. But, I do have students who STRUGGLE with doing the work themselves. They simply want to give up and have the teacher (or their friends) give them the answer. Hence, why we've started to incorporate these activities into the class.


However, they've requested another digital breakout for the end of the year. Fingers crossed that their mindset has shifted and ALL the groups will be successful.

#technologytuesday #teamchallenge #digitalbreakout #techtip #middleschool #makerspace #growthmindset


This week’s #makerspace highlight was Easter Egg themed. Here are some of our successes!

I challenged students to choose one of the following: 1) make a parachute, with plastic egg attached, that would float the longest (supply options: coffee filters, pipe cleaners, tape, yarn)

2) use 15 pipe cleaners to build a structure that would hold 3 plastic eggs.


3) the tallest free-standing tower that incorporates plastic eggs (using pipe cleaners and/or K'Nex)


Most students chose the parachute option. I love that many ended up with version 4.0 of their parachute design. It was truly a maker mindset class!


#makerspace #makermonday #middleschool #growthmindset #stemchallenge #building


If you saw last week’s Friday Five, you know that I’m currently reading an advance copy of “Momentous Events in the Life of a Cactus” by Dusti Bowling.


This book, scheduled to be published in September, is the sequel to one of my TOP picks for middle school last year: "Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus."


I adore Aven, and highlighted the first book in my #yalit seminars all year long last year. In addition to being inspiring, with lots of discussion potential, it is also a humorous and utterly charming read. There are MANY ways that you could use the book in your school, library, or classroom with students in grades 5-8.


I know that I should have finished this book in one sitting, but I just want to savor the experience as long as possible...so I’m only reading it a chapter at a time. Stay tuned for my final reactions!

FYI, Bowling’s 2018 book “24 Hours in Nowhere” is a TOP middle school pick in my #kidlit and #yalit seminars this year. Hooray for authors that write great MIDDLE SCHOOL books!


What are you reading this week?



#amreading #mrsyuskoreads #mrsyuskofavorite #sequel #middleschool #yalit #top10 #whatimreading


This week’s #makerspace highlight was Valentine’s Day themed.


I challenged students to build a 3-D heart using K’Nex, Legos, wood blocks (aka our Jenga game), or paper. These are some of the highlights.


What’s interesting is I let this class take the materials outside and we set up building stations in their outdoor "lunch room.” Maybe it was the fresh air, or maybe it was because it was Friday, but this class really rose to the challenge and built creative hearts. A few even begged to finish theirs up on Monday.


Love these Makerspace classes. Stay tuned... we’re starting Shark Tank-esque invention/innovation projects in a couple of weeks.



#makerspaces #makermonday #middleschool

Sometimes it’s all about witnessing the “aha” moments.


Today in Makerspace class we were working on Code.org. I have several students that have learned the skills quickly and are working at levels far beyond their classmates.


One young woman spent today coding a Star Wars game, but she couldn’t quite get the code correct to get it to add up the score correctly while it was playing. She struggled with how to solve that step. We talked through possible solutions (I try to get the kids to figure it out, with guidance, rather than showing them the solution).


After restarting at least twice with no success, she decided to look at it tomorrow with fresh eyes instead, At this point, the young man sitting next to her (who was well below the level she was at), looked at her screen and said, “it looks like you need to do this...” Together they talked through his solution and within two minutes her game worked perfectly!


The “aha” moment for her? Sometimes you just need another person to help you see the process clearly...or from a different perspective. Teamwork makes the dream work and all that.


I LOVED watching the smiles and high 5s all around, and seeing the pride in their sense of accomplishment.


(FYI, this picture isn’t her game, but of her blowing through the first tutorial that I make all the students start with before they can choose their next level. She’s also made a Frozen game for her little sister to play).




#whyiteach #makerspace #middleschool #teamwork #coding

In the middle school Makerspace classes last week, we had our first team STEM challenge. Which was a way to get the students to practice teamwork, outside the box thinking, and the design process, while also having some fun.


It was a simple challenge: each team received 20 notecards and 3 feet of masking tape. They had 20 minutes to design and build the tallest free-standing tower that they could. Whiteboards were given for design purposes.


There were some basic rules:

1. The tower had to stand by itself for at least 10 seconds.

2. Groups could not tape the tower to the desk.

3. No using scissors or any other tool. Just their brains and their hands.

4. Groups could use all of the supplies, but did not need to.


Groups were given 2 minutes to brainstorm and guess-timate the height of the tower they would build. After the 20 minute build time, towers were measured and groups answered several questions relating to how they might approach the challenge differently next time.


Here are are some things that I noticed:

• I was surprised that two groups, one in each class, chose NOT to use the tape at all. Neither group was pleased with their final outcome but actually built decent towers.

•One group went so far as to name their tower based on their design.

• Several students wanted to tattle on classmates in other groups that were “peeking” or “copying.” Ah, middle school. (At the end of class, we discussed how studying other successful methods of doing something was a part of the business world).

• One class spent a LOT of time asking “can we...” questions instead of building. This was my class of “puppy dogs,” and I call them this when they are so worried about doing something “right” in order to be praised, instead of just trying. One of the goals I have for this class is to help them see that it is okay to fail.


I was proud of the groups for actually working together and listening to each other’s ideas. And some groups did come up with unique ways to build their tower. But I realized that we have some work to do on evaluating process/learning/design when I read some of the responses to “what would you do differently next time to improve your design?” Several groups said, “get more supplies.” Well, not quite the answer I was hoping for.


#iteachmiddleschool



#makerspace #makermonday #stemchallenge #middleschool

I’m lucky that I get to teach a #makerspace elective in the middle school this semester. Three weeks in and I’m loving every minute of it!


I have always incorporated makerspace activities and spaces in my libraries and classrooms, but to actually get to “teach” a class...? So very lucky!


Because I

1) don’t have my own classroom or place to store materials,

2) have 27 students in a classroom built for 16, and cannot spread out and set up stations,

and 3) have multiple grade levels,

I am making the curriculum as I go week-to-week. But isn’t that what education is? Learn, teach, adapt, repeat.


So far, I’ve been keeping with my goal of rotating through 4 types of classes/“lessons”/activities:

1) Coding

2) Creativity

3) Building and board games

4) STEM challenges


Growth mindset, thinking outside the box, collaboration, and resilience are always part of our lessons! The first few weeks have been free-form exploration of choices available depending on how the day is designated. (See the photos from our introduction to Lightbot.com and our first “free build” day).






This week they they will get their first Team STEM challenge where they’ll have to work together and go through the design process. Fingers crossed!


Do you have favorite middle school Makerspace activities, lessons, books? What is popular with your students?


#middleschool #electives #growthmindset #coding

Here are some of our favorite read-alouds from the last couple of weeks!


1) Penguin Problems by Jory John, illustrated by Lane Smith.


If this isn’t an ode to angsty, eye-rolling teenagers on a Friday, I don’t know what is. I read this to my Contemporary Lit class of seniors and their commentary and asides were fantastic. And I’m going to be honest, we have at least one such “penguin” in the class.


Over the the weekend I discovered ”Giraffe Problems” by the same duo. I’ve already put a hold on it! Cannot wait to compare/contrast!



2) How to Code a Sandcastle by Josh Funk, illustrated by Sara Palacios


I‘m also teaching a middle school Makerspace elective this semester so I used this one after we had learned Lightbot.com and before logging in to Code.org for the first time. It may be geared to young elementary but it did help reinforce concepts for the MS students in a humorous way.



3) Ish by Peter H. Reynolds


We have read many books by Reynolds for #classroombookaday, and this was just the latest. This one REALLY helped reinforce growth mindset, thinking outside the box, and not listening to negative comments (and, of course, not saying negative things to our classmates).



Do you participate in #classroombookaday? What are some of your favorite ones to read and share with students?


Picture books = for kids of ALL ages!

#picturebooks #middleschool #highschool #kidlit #picturebooksintheclassroom #readaloud



I enjoy using this interactive magnetic poetry device from Read.Write.Think. I usually introduce my classes to it in January when we incorporate books about Martin Luther King Jr. and his "I Have a Dream" speech.


I have students create their own original poem (story, thought, sentence) using the words from Dr. King's speech (it is one of the Famous Speeches that students can use as a word bank). There are also options to add your own words and create your own word bank. Students can also change the font color, size, and poem background to reflect the theme/mood/tone of their writing.


I have students email me their final product and then we print and display in class.

While we use the online version (which I send a link to), it is also available as an app in the iTunes and Google Play stores. For a low tech version of our activity (which I’ve actually done when the Internet wasn’t working), you can give students a printout of the speech, or a page from any book, and encourage them to cut out the words and manipulate it just like magnetic poetry.


Enjoy playing with words!


Here are are some samples from my middle school and high school students:




#classroom #technology #poetry #techtidbit #middleschool #highschool

Updated: Mar 25, 2019


Tomorrow is the first day of December, and the holiday season is upon us! Not to mention, many of us are using our Funko Pop Harry Potter advent calendar to countdown to the start of winter break. (So. Close. We got this!)


For this week's Friday Five, I thought I would stray from the "Five" formula just a bit. I give you 12 of the books on my Holiday Gift List, from picture book to my favorite adult memoir. And I'm definitely going well over the 5:00 minute time limit.

Stay tuned next week to the website and I'll post the FULL LIST of gift book suggestions for all ages, PreK-Adult. Uncle Joe? Grandma Joan? Your nephew? Books make great gifts for everyone, especially your own kids, and there is a book for every reader on the list. Also, if you have kids of your own and you plan on getting their teacher(s) a gift this holiday season, consider a monetary (gift card) donation to help them add to their classroom library. We love new books, and so do the students we teach!


In the meantime, this week's Friday Five will help you check off some of your holiday shopping list. Happy Reading and Happy Holidays! #FridayFive #newbooks #highschool #middleschool #yalit #nonfiction #memoir #picturebook #kidlit #elementary #giftbooks #booksmakegreatgifts #mrsyuskoreads #booksuggestions

The week before Thanksgiving I was on the road presenting #YALIT seminars throughout MN, WI, and ND (can I just say, "BRRRRRRRRR!"). I love talking about best books with teachers and librarians throughout the country, but I find that when I'm talking about books all day, I rarely read in the evenings. I know, I know, #booknerdproblems.


So, when I get a chance to rest and recharge for a week, I usually READ nonstop. So, here are the 5 best YA books that I read this week, along with my ratings (on a 5 star scale): 1) More Than We Can Tell by Brigid Kemmerer. Grades 8-12. LOVED IT! 4 stars! Currently on hold for the companion book that I didn't even know existed.

2) Someone Else's Shoes by Ellen Wittlinger. Grades 5-8. 3 stars. Everyone loves this one. I thought it was okay. I liked several of the storylines, but to be honest, I didn't really like the main character.


3) Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi. Grades 3-6. 3 stars. It's good, and elementary classrooms and libraries looking for more and diverse stories for Percy Jackson fans will definitely want this series starter. It's just not my personal genre.


4) Broken Things by Lauren Oliver. Grades 9-12. 3.5 stars. I like the author and this has a terrific first line/first chapter! Decent mystery and lots to keep you guessing.


5) American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott. Grades 8-12. 4 stars! Hooray, I started and ended the week with titles I really enjoyed. WOW! This one doesn't pull any punches. Just a compelling family road trip story...with a touch of romance.


HAPPY READING!


#fridayfive #newbooks #vacationreading #middleschool #middlegrade #amreading #mrsyuskoreads





This week marked the start of award season...National Book Award season. The National Book Foundation announced their longlist (the Top 10) in several categories this week, including Young People's Literature. It is an outstanding list this year, and will be tough to choose a winner. But I decided to give it a go in this week's episode and I offer you my five favorite books from the 2018 longlist. For a full-list of the this year's nominees in all the categories, visit the National Book Foundation website. Happy Reading and enjoy the weekend! #nationalbookawards #FridayFive #awardwinners #newbooks #highschool #middleschool #yalit #nonfiction #memoir

Links to the 2018 books I highlighted: The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo. The Journey of Little Charlie by Christopher Paul Curtis Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett Krosoczka Boots on the Ground by Elizabeth Partridge We'll Fly Away by Bryan Bliss Past books I mentioned: March by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell Ghost by Jason Reynolds Far From the Tree by Robin Benway


It's Friday, and that means it's time for Friday Five. This week, I thought I would highlight the 5 books in my car. But let's be real, there's more than 5 books in my car. I'm on my way to school, where I'm booktalking to high school students all day...plus my regular middle school classes. Happy Aloha Friday and happy reading!

Here's a list of the books mentioned in the video: The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds. Candlewick. K-5th grades. Fireboat by Maira Kalman. GP Putnam Books for Young Readers. K-3rd grades. I Walk with Vanessa by Kerascoet. Schwartz & Wades. K-2nd grades. See You on a Starry Night by Lisa Schroeder. Scholastic Press. 4th-7th grades. Hunt for the Bamboo Rat by Graham Salisbury. Wendy Lamb Books. 7th-10th grades. Alexander Hamilton, Revolutionary by Martha Brockenbrough. Feiwel & Friends. 7th-adult. #fridayfive #kidlit #picturebooks #yalit #booktalks #middleschool #highschool

WHAT YOUR COLLEAGUES ARE SAYING:

Guadelupe, Teacher, CA

The knowledge and passion for books for EVERY reader  has hooked me! She is in the classroom and just gets readers.

Dee, Teacher-Librarian, CA

Wowza! One of the best, packed workshops, filled with RELEVANT content, delivered in a well organized, engagingly paced seminar. HIGHLY RECOMMEND to librarians and lovers of literature.

Lindsey, English Teacher, TX

Excellent content, EXCEPTIONAL presenter! The entire presentation was engaging and meaningful. I am excited to have the opportunity to take all of these amazing titles and introduce my students to them.

Laurie, Librarian, IL

GREAT SEMINAR! Shauna was fantastic. My booklist is overflowing and I can't wait to share these books with students, and educate my teachers.

Julia, School Librarian, PA

I can't wait to get these books into the hands of my students!

Chad, LA Teacher, IL

Shauna reinforces the idea that there are two types of students: those who like to read and those who haven't found the right book yet. She offers a plethora of resources and titles for both!

Guadelupe, Teacher, CA

The knowledge and passion for books for EVERY reader  has hooked me! She is in the classroom and just gets readers.

Dee, Teacher-Librarian, CA

Wowza! One of the best, packed workshops, filled with RELEVANT content, delivered in a well organized, engagingly paced seminar. HIGHLY RECOMMEND to librarians and lovers of literature.

Lindsey, English Teacher, TX

Excellent content, EXCEPTIONAL presenter! The entire presentation was engaging and meaningful. I am excited to have the opportunity to take all of these amazing titles and introduce my students to them.

Guadelupe, Teacher, CA

The knowledge and passion for books for EVERY reader  has hooked me! She is in the classroom and just gets readers.

Dee, Teacher-Librarian, CA

Wowza! One of the best, packed workshops, filled with RELEVANT content, delivered in a well organized, engagingly paced seminar. HIGHLY RECOMMEND to librarians and lovers of literature.

Lindsey, English Teacher, TX

Excellent content, EXCEPTIONAL presenter! The entire presentation was engaging and meaningful. I am excited to have the opportunity to take all of these amazing titles and introduce my students to them.

Become a Subscriber!

Learn about the best new books from the comfort of your living room. Become a subscriber and get access to monthly webinars (watch yourself or show in your classroom), book reviews, curriculum connections, a newsletter, and more! 

Bring Shauna to Your Teachers!

No BER seminar in your area? Don't worry! Contact me if your building or district is interested in customized,
on-site seminars. Full-day and half-day seminars available.

Contact Me

  • Black Instagram Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

© 2023 by The Book Lover. Proudly created with Wix.com